U.S. Army South – A Brief History

U.S. Army South was established in December 1986 with headquarters located at Fort Clayton, Panama which was subsequently relocated in August 1999 to Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico and finally to Fort Sam Houston, Texas in September 2002.

Since the 1990s U.S. Army South has transformed from an Army command focused almost exclusively on the Panama Canal to one with a much larger role in the region—enhancing hemispheric security by building strong relationships, enhancing mutual capabilities, and improving interoperability with the armies and security forces of Central and South America and the Caribbean.

In addition to PANAMAX, U.S. Army South participates in army-to-army exercises, counter drug operations, peace keeping missions, humanitarian missions, disaster relief, senior leader engagements and subject matter expert exchanges and training with partner nations.

U.S. Army South can conduct contigency operations and a variety of missions, which include dealing with conventional threats, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief; and supporting civil authorities in countering illicit trafficking and transnational organized crime. U.S. Army South exercises military command and control of all assigned personnel and units, and represents the U.S. Southern Command with respect to Army matters in the region.

1904-1914:  ICC / Panama Canal Guard

  • On Mar. 8, 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed an Isthmian Canal Commission (ICC), composed primarily of Army officers, to govern the Canal Zone and to report directly to the Secretary of War.
  • In 1911 the U.S. Army began building defensive fortifications - to include Forts DeLesseps, Randolph and Sherman on the Atlantic side, and Forts Amador and Grant on the Pacific side.
  • On Oct. 4, 1911, a regiment of the U.S. Army 10th Infantry arrived at Camp E.S. Otis. These troops, along with infantry, cavalry as well as a Marine battalion, fell under the control of the ICC, and became known as the Panama Canal Guard.

1914-1917: U.S. Troops - Panama Canal Zone

  • At the end of 1914, the Panama Canal Guard was redesignated U.S. Troops - Panama Canal Zone

1917-1947: U.S. Army Panama Canal Department

  • On July 1, 1917, the Panama Canal Department was established as a separate geographic command with headquarters at Quarry Heights, Panama. Units included the 19th Brigade, composed of the 14th and 33rd Infantry, the 42nd Field Artillery, the 11th Engineers, and special troops.
  • On Feb. 10, 1941, the Caribbean Defense Command (CDC) became the senior Army headquarters in the region, assuming operational responsibility over air and naval forces assigned in its area of operations.

1947-1963: U.S. Army Caribbean

  • In December 1946, President Truman approved a comprehensive system of military commands that put responsibility for military operations in various geographical areas in the hands of a single commander. U.S. Caribbean Command was designated on Nov. 1, 1947.
  • On Nov. 15, 1947, the Panama Canal Department became U.S. Army Caribbean (USARCARIB), headquartered at Fort Amador.

1963-1986: U.S. Army Forces Southern Command

  • On June 6, 1963, the U.S. Caribbean Command became U.S. Southern Command 1986-Present: U.S. Army South

1986: U.S. Army South

  • On Dec. 4, 1986, U.S. Army South was activated as a Major Army Command and the Army component of USSOUTHCOM

1999: Relocation

  • U.S. Army South relocated to Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico.

2003: Relocation

  • U.S. Army South relocated to its present location at Fort Sam Houston, Texas - Joint Base San Antonio.

2006 - 2008: Designation and Expansion of Responsibilities:

  • U.S. Army South became an Army Service Component Command (ASCC). The command expanded its size and capabilities to include an Operation Command Post and integrated Sixth U.S. Army making it capable of forming or joining a task force, which it successfully executed for Operation Unified Response and Joint Task Force-Haiti in 2010.

 

U.S. Army South Unit Awards Earned 

Philippine Presidential Unit Citation - 1941 World War II 

Meritorious Unit Commendation - 1944 World War II

Army Superior Unit Award - 1994 Operation Uphold Democracy

Army Superior Unit Award - 2011 Operation Unified Response

 

Former U.S. Army South Commanding Generals

 

 

Historic Lineage of Army South Generals

                      

Rank

Last Name

First Name

Start Date of Command

End Date of Command

1.   MG

Edwards

C.R.

November 16, 1914

August 12, 1917

2.   BG

Plumner

E.H.

April 12, 1917

August 14, 1917

3.   MG

Cronkhite

Adelbert

August 14, 1917

August 31, 1917

4.   COL

Landers

C.E.

August 31, 1917

February 28, 1918

5.   MG

Blatchford

R.N.

February 28, 1918

April 18, 1919

6.   MG

Kennedy

C.W.

April 18, 1919

May 24, 1921

7.   BG

Babbit

Edwin E.

May 24, 1921

October 22, 1921

8.   MG

Sturgis

Samuel E.

October 22, 1921

September 19, 1924

9.   MG

Lassiter

William

September 19, 1924

June 13, 1926

10. MG

Martin

C.H.

June 13, 1926

October 2, 1927

11. MG

Graves

W.J.

October 2, 1927

April 1, 1928

12. MG

Craig

Malin

April 1, 1928

August 10, 1930

13. MG

Erwin

L.R.

August 10, 1930

November 24, 1930

14. MG

Brown

Preston

November 24, 1930

September 5, 1933

15. MG

Fiske

Harold B.

September, 1933

November 10, 1935

16. MG

Brown

Lytle

November 10, 1935

July 30, 1936

17. MG

Butler

H.W.

July 30, 1936

February 10, 1937

18. BG

Rowell

F.W.

February10, 1937

April 12, 1937

19. MG

Stone

David L.

April 12, 1937

January 8, 1940

20. LTG

Van Voorhis

Daniel

January8, 1940

September 19, 1941

21. LTG

Andrews

Frank M.

September 19, 1941

November 9, 1942

22. LTG

Brett

George H.

November 9, 1942

October 15, 1945

23. LTG

Crittenberger

Willis D.

October 15, 1945

November 15, 1947

24. MG

Brooks

Edward H.

November15, 1947

November 21, 1948

25. MG

Porter

Ray E.

November 21, 1948

November 30, 1951

26. MG

Whitlock

L.J.

December 1, 1951

July 11, 1954

27. MG

McGarr

Lionel C.

July 12, 1954

June 30, 1956

28. MG

Harrold

Thomas

June 24, 1956

June 27, 1958

29. MG

Dasher

Charles L.

June 28, 1958

June 1, 1960

30. MG

Bogart

Theodore F.

June 1, 1960

July 1, 1964

31. LTG

Alger

James D.

July 1, 1964

July 20, 1967

32. MG

Johnson

Chester L.

July 21, 1967

December 3, 1970

33. MG

Mabry

George L. Jr.

December 5, 1970

December 1, 1974

34. MG

Richardson

William R.

December 1, 1974

June 16, 1977

35. MG

Anson

Richard W.

June 16, 1977

June 5, 1979

36. BG

Lever

Keith C.

June 5, 1979

April 5, 1982

37. MG

Woerner

Fred F.

April 5, 1982

March 14, 1986

38. MG

Taylor

James

March 14, 1986

April 28, 1987

39. MG

Loeffke

Bernard

April 28, 1987

June 25, 1989

40. MG

Cisneros

Marc A.

July 25, 1989

July 12, 1990

41. BG

Kinzer

Joseph W.

July 12,1990

September 12, 1990

42. MG

Hartzog

William W.

September 12, 1990

July 5, 1991

43. MG

Timmons

Richard F.

July 5, 1991

May 5, 1993

44. BG

Wilson

James

May 5, 1993

July 11, 1993

45. MG

Crocker

George A.

June 11, 1993

March 3, 1995

46. MG

Magruder III

Lawson W.

March 3, 1995

May 16, 1997

47. MG

Kensinger

Phillip R.

May 16, 1997

July 11, 2000

48. MG

Valenzuela

Alfred A.

July 11,2000

October 31, 2003

49. MG

Gardener

John D.

October 31, 2003

October 28, 2005

50. MG

Keen

P.K.

October 28, 2005

August 16, 2007

51. MG

Huber

Keith M.

August 16, 2007

November 9, 2009

52. MG

Trombitas

Simeon G.

 November 9, 2009

September 14, 2012

53. MG

Rudesheim

Frederick S.

September 14, 2012

June 24, 2013

54. MG

DiSalvo

Joseph P.

June 24, 2013

Present

 

 

 

 Juntos Podemos! – Together We Can!